Superstition Mountains Publication Enigmas
June 2002



What follows is a list Greg Davis prepared of the most elusive Lost Dutchman publications. These are works that Greg and others have seen or at least heard of, but which they have been unable to locate or in some cases even verify. Greg sent me the list and I am putting it up on the web site in hopes that some of you may know more about these items - or even have copies.

"Over the course of 50 years of collecting books, magazines, newspaper articles and everything else pertaining to the Superstition Mountain Region and the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine, I have been made aware of a number of items regarding these subjects but have been unable to locate them. I decided to prepare a listing of these elusive publications in hopes that our readers will recognize some of them and their current locations. If possible, we would like to obtain the actual item, however if this is not possible, a photocopy will do fine. These items will be added to our ever growing research library at the Superstition Mountain Historical Society. Thank you for your help with this endeavor and good luck hunting." - Greg Davis

1. I Found the Dutchman's Lost Mine. No author. Philadelphia: Pickwick Papers Publishing Company, 1921. This citation originally appeared in the magazine Western Treasures, February 1972, page 68, (Frank Taylor, editor). Cited in the article, Lost Dutchman Mine Research Sources.

I attempted to contact Frank Taylor about this article. It took me three years to locate him and by that time he remembered little about the article and only said that it was part of their Lost Dutchman folder at the office. By then the office had moved and the current editors no longer had the files. Just what the item is no one seems to know. Is it a book, magazine, pamphlet, or part of a newspaper? I tend to believe that it is either a newspaper article or part of a newspaper supplement, however that is just speculation. I would suggest the place to start the search would be the libraries and historical societies in Philadelphia to find out about the Pickwick Papers Publishing Company during that time frame and find out what items they published. DO NOT get this mixed up with the Pickwick Papers Club that published the Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens or the Pickwick Travel Company which published a magazine several years later.

2. Clark, C.M. History of the Lost Dutchman Mine. Los Angeles: Blackmer Company, 1926. Soft cover; xii + 70 pages, preface, introduction, photographs, maps, tables, references, 6X9 inches. "A reprint of the author's article in the Arizona Mining Journal, Vol. 8 No. 21, with an extensive commentary by Otis M. Blackmer. A definitive analysis of the famous Lost Dutchman story. Neither proves or disproves the legend."

This reference first appeared in the book, Journals of El Dorado, by Estee Conatser and Karl Von Mueller (Dallas: Ram Publishing Company, 1977) on page 63. I knew both Estee Conatser and Karl Von Mueller, real name Dean Miller. This was one of Dean's citations and he claimed that he actually had a copy of the pamphlet, however before I could get up to his residence to see the item there was a fire in the storage shop where it was keep and it was lost to the fire. I had a friend do some research in Los Angeles and he found that there was indeed an Otis Blackmer living in Los Angles in 1926. Dean wrote me a letter once concerning this item and he mentioned that it was done by Blackmer and Hedge. Estee Conatser also wrote me about it and said she had actually seen a copy of it but did not have one in her collection. I would suggest the place to start the search would be at libraries and historical societies in Los Angeles. See if there was listed in the directories or papers a Blackmer Publishing Company in 1926, if Mr. Blackmer did live in Los Angeles at that time, and if he has any living relatives.

3. Fr. John Curro (the name may be Cuneo, Curre, Curs). The Basis of the Lost Dutchman Mine and the Peraltas-Being a Documentary from Church and Official U.S. Army Records. Phoenix: publisher and address unknown, 1953. 68 pages. Listed in the center pages are a number of mission histories and biographical books about priests.

This item was bought to my attention in a letter from Karl Von Mueller in 1983. It appears that the author may be a priest but I am not sure. A friend of mine did some research in Catholic Church records and found no listing for a Fr. John Curro in the Phoenix area at that time, however he need not have been from the Phoenix area. I have no idea what the publication's format is - book, pamphlet, mimeograph, manuscript?

4. A book about the Lost Dutchman Mine, unknown title and author.

This was a mimeographed book about the Lost Dutchman Mine published in the late 1920s in Superior Arizona by an area prospector. The book was seen by Tom Kollenborn in the Superior High School's library while on a visit to Superior. It may possibly have a red cover, or lithograph. Tom told me that the author or publisher may be a person named Brandon and that a female volunteer at the Clara Woody Museum in Globe also remembered the book. By the way, the Superior High School is now closed.

5. Maniley. The Peralta Stone Maps.

This is the same book as Crossland's This Trail is Dangerous (the authors, Maniley, Crossland, and Bennett are all the same person). The inside of the book was printed in Apache Junction at Denver's printing place. Then Crossland took the insides of the book to Yuma and had covers made. (The cover with the Peralta Stone Maps by Maniley was a prototype cover made by Denver as a test cover). Crossland had a box of these books with this prototype cover and a friend of mine, Dan Hopper, actually saw them in the trunk of Crossland's car one night while visiting him. Dan said that when Crossland saw him looking at the books he quickly closed the trunk and said that they were nothing. To date I have not heard of any of these copies of Crossland's book with the prototype cover surfacing. The book would be a soft cover and about 72 pages. Crossland's last known residence was Yuma Arizona, but to my knowledge Crossland is no longer living.

6. The following two items pertain to books mentioned on the back inside cover of Tales of the Southwest by Barry Storm (Storm Publishing Associates, Inyokern, CA, 1958). One isTales of the Southwest sold with a different cover, the other is part of Tales of the Southwest sold as a separate publication.

6A. Storm, Barry. Tales of the Southwest. "A Western story bonanza! Three books in one, I - "Western Vignettes" II - "The Mountains That Were God" III - "California Gold"... Beautifully illustrated, colored, washable impreglin cloth cover. 232 pages on 70 lb. deluxe paper. 16 photographs and maps. Large 8 vo. size, 1958..."

This is a copy of Barry Storm's Tales of the Southwest with a CLOTH cover. All of the copies I have seen over the years have the FLEXIBOUND type cover, which is just a piece of thick card stock. Flexibound covers are less expensive than cloth covers. It is a copy of the cloth cover edition we are trying to locate.

6B. Storm, Barry. The Mountains That Were God. "Book II from "Tales of the Southwest." The incredible factual story of the sinister Superstition Mountains Mining District of Arizona where Spanish adventurers, massacring Apaches and a horde of unlucky treasure hunters, since days of the fabulous Lost Dutchman, lived the true story of America's most famed lost mines mystery. Heavy, illustrated card cover, 70 exciting pages. Large 8 vo. size."

What Barry Storm did was take book II (chapter 2) from Tales of the Southwest and bind it in a different cover, making it a separate book. I saw a copy of this item in the Los Angeles Public Library about 25 years ago, however it disappeared after they had the big fire in the library several years ago. DO NOT get this confused with Barry Storm's book Thunder Gods Gold, The Mountains That Were God from 1967 (this one was published in 1958).

7. Barry Storm. Thunder Gods Gold. No date. A special leather-bound enlarged edition, with a stock certificate in the back of the book. Barry Storm used this special edition to give to persons who had invested in his mining ventures. Size, pages, type, are unknown.

Milton Rose and Dave Sutton told me about this book and claimed to have seen a copy of it in the book collection of one of Barry Storm's investors. It was the only copy they had ever seen. As I recall, Milton and Dave saw it sometime between the mid-1970s and mid-1980s.

8. Peralta (The Peralta Family History). Author and date of publication unknown, hardcover, about 85-95 pages.

This book was seen by Gene Reynolds sometime in the late 1970s at the home of Adolph Ruth's daughter, Stella Hawkins, in Washington, D.C. Her house had also been the home of the late Erwin Ruth. Gene was allowed to read it for a short time and he said it contained a family history of the Peraltas and their mining activities in the Southwest. It also contained some handwritten notes by Adolph Ruth. I do not know if this book was one of a kind, from a vanity press for Peralta family members, or a regularly published book.

9. The Lost German Mine. Author unknown, date of publication unknown. Small book, probably gray-green in color.

This item was brought to my attention by Milton Rose some 15 years ago. He was having lunch at Denny's Restaurant in Glendale with his usual lunch group when one of the non-regular member mentioned he had this old mining history book called The Lost German Mine. He explained it to Milton. Milton told his friend that this might be an early story about the Lost Dutchman Mine. Milt's friend promised to bring the book for Milt to see the next time he was at the restaurant. Milt's friend never showed up at Denny's again and Milt later learned he had moved out of the state leaving no forwarding address.

10. Simson, Ruth. Doc Thorns Lost Gold. New York: Madera Press, 1911. First edition. Hardcover, gray cloth cover, 2,500 copies printed.

This book was seen by Tom Kollenborn in the 1980s in Chandler at the ranch being used by Robert Jacobs (Crazy Jake). Jake was showing Tom his book collection on lost mines and pulled this one out for Tom to see. After doing some research on the book it appears Madera Press in New York did indeed exist, but for only three years. They specialized in limited edition vanity press items, which is probably what this is.

11. Thorne, A.D. Doctor Thorne's Lost Gold. New Mexico: published prior to 1896.

This book was brought to my attention by Nyle Latham, a retired photographer for the old Republic and Gazette newspapers of Arizona. He saw this book in the base library at Haneda Airforce Base in Japan in 1954. He specifically remembers looking at the book and reading a chapter. He then took it to the librarian and said that it should be filed in the history section instead of the fiction section, however, when he returned a week later it was still in the fiction section.

I've found no references to it here in the United States. It is possible that it was published in Canada, Great Britain, Australia or New Zealand, I just don't know. I am also not one hundred percent certain that this is the correct title. Milton Rose also told me once that he had seen a copy in Japan after the war but did not remember where. Nyle did say that it did not have a dust jacket and was about the size of a standard fiction or literature book of the time.

12. The Lost Dutchman Mine. Chicago: Coronet Instructional Media, 1979. One filmstrip, (57 feet), color, 35 mm, sound cassette. Title from the container. M0401. Superstition Mountains (Arizona) Juvenile films. This is a quote from a media listing of educational films. It is probably one of those old filmstrips they used in the schools. Not sure where to start looking for it.

13. Booster or Brooster. Lost Dutchman Mine. Unpublished manuscript.

This item was brought to my attention by Karl Von Mueller in a letter dated November 1983. I quote: "They mentioned also another guy by the name of Booster or Brooster, (I hope the spelling is right) which has an unpublished manuscript that deals extensively with the LDM and it is in the library at the University of Texas. It runs over 1,000 double-spaced pages or maybe it is 2,000. It covers the LDM and some other plausible mines that were lost."

14. Storm, Barry. In Arizona. Sheet music. "Musical Score: Printed music folder (3.) 31 cm. Phoenix, Ariz., 1949."

This is a song that Barry wrote which was published in sheet music format. It is advertised in one of Barry's publications, however I have never seen a copy of it. He may have published it earlier in 1947, but not sure. (There is a note in the cataloging record that says: "Not the same as his 1947 song with the same name." -DS)


Summary listing of these items:

1. I Found the Dutchman's Lost Mine. No author. Philadelphia: Pickwick Papers Publishing Company, 1921.

2. Clark, C.M. History of the Lost Dutchman Mine. Los Angeles: Blackmer Company, 1926. Soft cover; xii, 70 pages, preface, introduction, photographs, maps, tables, references, 6X9 inches.

3. Fr. John Curro (or Cuneo, Curre, Curs). The Basis of the Lost Dutchman Mine and the Peraltas-Being a Documentary from Church and Official U.S. Army Records. Published in Phoenix in 1953, publisher and address unknown, 68 pages.

4. A book about the Lost Dutchman Mine, unknown title and author. Mimeographed book about the Lost Dutchman Mine put out in the late 1920s in Superior Arizona by an area prospector.

5. Maniley. The Peralta Stone Maps.

6a. Storm, Barry. Tales of the Southwest. 1958. Washable impreglin cloth cover. 232 pages on 70 lb. deluxe paper. 16 photographs and maps.

6b. Storm, Barry. The Mountains That Were God. Book II from Tales of the Southwest. Heavy, illustrated card cover, 70 exciting pages. Large 8 vo. size, 1958.

7. Storm, Barry. Thunder Gods Gold. No date. Special leather-bound, enlarged, edition with stock certificate in the back of the book.

8. Peralta (The Peralta Family History). Author and date of publication unknown, hardcover, about 85-95 pages.

9. The Lost German Mine. Author and date of publication unknown.

10. Simson, Ruth. Doc Thorn's Lost Gold. New York: Madera Press, 1911.

11. Thorne, A.D. Doctor Thorne's Lost Gold. Published in New Mexico, no date, but prior to 1896.

12. The Lost Dutchman Mine. Chicago: Coronet Instructional Media, 1979. One filmstrip, (57 feet), color, 35 mm, sound cassette.

13. Booster or Brooster. Lost Dutchman Mine. Unpublished manuscript.

14. Storm, Barry. In Arizona. Sheet music. "Musical Score: Printed music folder (3.) 31 cm. Phoenix, Ariz., 1949."